Indian Home Guard (American Civil War)

The Indian Home Guard were volunteer infantry regiments recruited from the Five Civilized Tribes of Indian Territory to support the Union during the American Civil War.

The leaders of all of the Five Civilized Tribes signed treaties with the Confederacy at the start of the Civil War. Many of the tribal members, however, did not support the Confederacy, and, not being organized, were driven from Indian Territory with a large loss of life. Most fled to Kansas and Missouri. Many of the "Loyal" Indians volunteered for Union duty in order to get control back from the Confederate generals. The Indian Home Guard regiments fought mostly in Indian Territory and Arkansas. It was mainly due to these Loyal Indians that the Five Civilized Tribes were able to retain any of their lands following the end of the Civil War.

Other related articles:

Indian Home Guard (American Civil War) - Indian Home Guard Regiments - 4th Regiment, Indian Home Guard
... Organization commenced but not completed ... Men transferred to other organizations ...

Famous quotes containing the words civil, indian, guard and/or home:

    ... as a result of generations of betrayal, it’s nearly impossible for Southern Negroes to trust a Southern white. No matter what he does or what he suffers, a white liberal is never established beyond suspicion in the hearts of the minority.
    Sarah Patton Boyle, U.S. civil rights activist and author. The Desegregated Heart, part 2, ch. 10 (1962)

    The principal thing children are taught by hearing these lullabies is respect. They are taught to respect certain things in life and certain people. By giving respect, they hope to gain self-respect and through self-respect, they gain the respect of others. Self-respect is one of the qualities my people stress and try to nurture, and one of the controls an Indian has as he grows up. Once you lose your self-respect, you just go down.
    Henry Old Coyote (20th century)

    Harsh necessity, and the newness of my kingdom, force me to do such things and to guard my frontiers everywhere.
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70–19 B.C.)

    “Farewell to barn and stack and tree,
    Farewell to Severn shore.
    Terence, look your last at me,
    For I come home no more.
    —A.E. (Alfred Edward)