Future

The future is the indefinite time period after the present. Its arrival is considered inevitable due to the existence of time and the laws of physics. Due to the apparent nature of reality and the unavoidability of the future, everything that currently exists and will exist can be categorized as either permanent, meaning that it will exist for the whole of the future or temporary, meaning that it won't and thus will come to an end. The future and the concept of eternity have been major subjects of philosophy, religion, and science and defining them non-controversially has consistently eluded the greatest of minds. It is the opposite of the past. In the Occidental view, which uses a linear conception of time, the future is the portion of the projected time line that is anticipated to occur. In special relativity, the future is considered to be absolute future or the future light cone. In physics, time is considered to be the fourth dimension of the universe.

In the philosophy of time, presentism is the belief that only the present exists and the future and the past are unreal. Religions consider the future when they address issues such as karma, life after death, and eschatologies that study what the end of time and the end of the world will be. Religious figures such as prophets and diviners have claimed to see into the future. Organized efforts to predict or forecast the future may have derived from observations by early man of heavenly objects.

Future studies, or futurology, is the science, art and practice of postulating possible futures. Modern practitioners stress the importance of alternative and plural futures, rather than one monolithic future, and the limitations of prediction and probability, versus the creation of possible and preferable futures.

In art and culture, the future was explored in several art movements and genres. The futurism art movement at the beginning of the 20th century, explored every medium of art, including painting, sculpture, poetry, theatre, music, architecture and even gastronomy. Futurists had passionate loathing of ideas from the past, especially political and artistic traditions. Instead, they espoused a love of speed, technology, and violence. Futuristic music involved homage to, inclusion of, or imitation of machines. Futurism expanded to encompass other artistic domains and ultimately included industrial design, textiles, and architecture.

Read more about Future:  Forecasting, Future Studies, Physics, Philosophy, Psychology, Religion

Other articles related to "future":

Future Shock - Broad Cultural Impact
... Curtis Mayfield's song "Future Shock" on the album "Back to the World" took its name from this book, and was in turn covered by Herbie Hancock as the title track for his 1983 ... "The Handsome Devils" with a track titled "Future Shock" ... Other works taking their title from the book include the Futurama episode "Future Stock" a segment on The Daily Show starring Samantha Bee Kevin Goldstein's ...
Shinkansen - Future - Gauge Change Train
... Experiments are taking place with a Gauge Change Train to enable direct operation between standard-gauge Shinkansen and narrow-gauge conventional lines this could be useful for the Kyushu Shinkansen branch to Nagasaki and other conventional lines ... Future implementation awaits practical operational tests ...
Future - In Art and Culture - Science Fiction
... defines science fiction as “ realistic speculation about possible future events, based solidly on adequate knowledge of the real world, past and present, and on a thorough ... science fiction is a broad genre of fiction that often involves speculations based on current or future science or technology ... Settings may include the future, or alternative time lines, and stories may depict new or speculative scientific principles, such as time travel or psionics, or new technology ...

Famous quotes containing the word future:

    The ellipse is as aimless as that,
    Stretching invisibly into the future so as to reappear
    In our present. Its flexing is its account,
    Return to the point of no return.
    John Ashbery (b. 1927)

    If the children and youth of a nation are afforded opportunity to develop their capacities to the fullest, if they are given the knowledge to understand the world and the wisdom to change it, then the prospects for the future are bright. In contrast, a society which neglects its children, however well it may function in other respects, risks eventual disorganization and demise.
    Urie Bronfenbrenner (b. 1917)

    There are many of us who cannot but feel dismal about the future of various cultures. Often it is hard not to agree that we are becoming culinary nitwits, dependent upon fast foods and mass kitchens and megavitamins for our basically rotten nourishment.
    M.F.K. Fisher (1908–1992)