Hopkins

Hopkins is an English, Welsh and Irish patronymic surname. The English and Welsh derivations mean "son of Hob". It derives from the Germanic warrior name Hrod-berht, translated as "renowned-fame". It was 'borrowed' into French, where the spelling was changed from "Hob" to "Robert". The name in Ireland is an Anglicisation of the Irish Gaelic name Mac Oibicin. The name increased in popularity in, and became associated with, Wales around the 17th century. The Robert spelling was introduced to England and Scotland after the Norman conquest of England.

Read more about Hopkins:  People Surnamed Hopkins, Fictional Characters

Other articles related to "hopkins":

Hopkins (disambiguation)
... Hopkins is an English and Welsh patronymic surname ... Hopkins may also refer to ...
Hopkins (disambiguation) - Education
... In the United States Johns Hopkins University, located in Baltimore, Maryland Johns Hopkins Hospital Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health ...
Cathy Caruth
... Locke, Wordsworth, Kant, Freud (Johns Hopkins UP, 1991) and Unclaimed Experience Trauma, Narrative and History (Johns Hopkins UP, 1996) she is also editor of ...
Hopkins (disambiguation) - Places
... Hopkins, Belize In the United States Hopkins, California was the name of Soda Springs, Nevada County, California Hopkins, Michigan Hopkins, Minnesota Hopkins, Missouri Hopkins, South Carolina Hopkins County ...
Hopkins, South Carolina - Attractions
... Hopkins is 6 miles (10 km) northwest of South Carolina's only national park, Congaree National Park, which is located off Bluff Road west of Gadsden ...

Famous quotes containing the word hopkins:

    As kingfishers catch fire, dragonflies draw flame;
    —Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844–1889)

    A great work by an Englishman is like a great battle won by England. It is an unfading bay tree.
    —Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844–1889)

    What would the world be, once bereft
    Of wet and wildness? Let them be left,
    O let them be left, wildness and wet;
    Long live the weeds and the wilderness yet.
    —Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844–1889)