Calls

Some articles on calls, call:

Brandon DiCamillo - Discography
... Unkle Matt and the ShitBirdz (2006) Gnarkall Prank Calls, Vol. 1 (2010) Gnarkall Prank Calls, Vol. 2 Assault on Call Waiting (2010) Gnarkall Prank Calls, Vol ...
Black-billed Magpie - Calls
... The most common calls of this bird are a nasal inquisitive "mag mag mag" or "yak yak yak", uttered in a much higher pitch than the European Magpie's ... Many other calls also exist, such as begging calls by females to their mate or by young to their parents, and distress calls when seized by predators ...
Winnipeg Police Service - Statistics
... Total Incoming Phone Calls Emergency 9-1-1 Calls – 196,189 Non-Emergency Calls – 366,484 Busiest Day Friday, June 30, 2006, with 2241 incoming calls Busiest ...
If Madonna Calls - Track Listings
... If Madonna Calls (X-Beat Radio Edit) If Madonna Calls (Jr's House Mix Radio Edit) If Madonna Calls (X-Beat Mix) If Madonna Calls (Tribal Break) If Madonna Calls (Jr's ...
NSA Electronic Surveillance Program - News Reporting - February 5, 2006
... during warrantless eavesdropping to justify interception of their (purely) domestic calls, as well ... companies in charge of international phone calls, including AT T, MCI, and Sprint, in its efforts to eavesdrop without warrants on international calls ...

Famous quotes containing the word calls:

    The mark of the man of the world is absence of pretension. He does not make a speech; he takes a low business-tone, avoids all brag, is nobody, dresses plainly, promises not at all, performs much, speaks in monosyllables, hugs his fact. He calls his employment by its lowest name, and so takes from evil tongues their sharpest weapon. His conversation clings to the weather and the news, yet he allows himself to be surprised into thought, and the unlocking of his learning and philosophy.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    The cigar-box which the European calls a “lift” needs but to be compared with our elevators to be appreciated. The lift stops to reflect between floors. That is all right in a hearse, but not in elevators. The American elevator acts like the man’s patent purge—it works
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)

    As a particularly dramatic gesture, he throws wide his arms and whacks the side of the barn with the heavy cane he uses to stab at contesting bidders. With more vehemence than grammatical elegance, he calls upon the great god Caveat Emptor to witness with what niggardly stinginess these flinty sons of Scotland make cautious offers for what is beyond any question the finest animal ever beheld.
    —Administration in the State of Arka, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)