What is teacher?

  • (noun): A person whose occupation is teaching.
    Synonyms: instructor
    See also — Additional definitions below

Teacher

A teacher or schoolteacher is a person who provides education for pupils (children) and students (adults). The role of teacher is often formal and ongoing, carried out at a school or other place of formal education. In many countries, a person who wishes to become a teacher must first obtain specified professional qualifications or credentials from a university or college. These professional qualifications may include the study of pedagogy, the science of teaching. Teachers, like other professionals, may have to continue their education after they qualify, a process known as continuing professional development. Teachers may use a lesson plan to facilitate student learning, providing a course of study which is called the curriculum.

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Some articles on teacher:

1978 US Open – Men's Singles - Draw - Section 4
6 0 2r Q Fagel 3 ... Kriek 7 ... Kriek 6 ... Q Dilouie 6 ... Kriek 7 ... Joubert 0 ... Teacher 6 ... Teacher 6 ... Teacher 6 ... Q Manson 6 ... Q Manson 4 ... Q Turpin 3 ... Teacher 6 ... Taróczy 5 ... Dibbs 3 ... Amaya ...
Feodor Gladkov - Teacher, Exile and Revolutionary
... the Social Revolutionary party in Chita, Irkutsk, joining the teachers' institute of Tiflis in the following year ...
1980 US Open – Men's Singles - Draw - Section 2
... Krishnan 6 ... Krishnan 6 ... Austin 11 ... Tanner 6 ... Teacher 6 ... Teacher 2 ... Ramírez 2 ... Teacher 6 ... Glickstein 6 ... Glickstein 3 ... Riessen 1. 1 ...
King George Secondary School - Former Staff
... Lee Rachar - Information Technology Department Head/Teacher (2008-2011), Teacher (-2011) Damian Wilmann — Vice Principal (2009–2012), Teacher (2004–2009 ...

More definitions of "teacher":

  • (noun): A personified abstraction that teaches.
    Example: "Books were his teachers"; "experience is a demanding teacher"

Famous quotes containing the word teacher:

    The teacher must derive not only the capacity, but the desire, to observe natural phenomena. In our system, she must become a passive, much more than an active, influence, and her passivity shall be composed of anxious scientific curiosity and of absolute respect for the phenomenon which she wishes to observe. The teacher must understand and feel her position of observer: the activity must lie in the phenomenon.
    Maria Montessori (1870–1952)

    Quintilian [educational writer in Rome about A.D. 100] hoped that teachers would be sensitive to individual differences of temperament and ability. . . . Beating, he thought, was usually unnecessary. A teacher who had made the effort to understand his pupil’s individual needs and character could probably dispense with it: “I will content myself with saying that children are helpless and easily victimized, and that therefore no one should be given unlimited power over them.”
    C. John Sommerville (20th century)

    At the utmost, the active-minded young man should ask of his teacher only mastery of his tools. The young man himself, the subject of education, is a certain form of energy; the object to be gained is economy of his force; the training is partly the clearing away of obstacles, partly the direct application of effort. Once acquired, the tools and models may be thrown away.
    Henry Brooks Adams (1838–1918)