What is Indian?

  • (adj): Of or relating to or characteristic of India or the East Indies or their peoples or languages or cultures.
    Example: "The Indian subcontinent"; "Indian saris"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on indian:

George Robert Aberigh-Mackay
... George Robert Aberigh-Mackay (July 25, 1848 – January 12, 1881), Anglo-Indian writer, son of a Bengal chaplain, was educated at Magdalen College School, Oxford and Cambridge University ... Entering the Indian education department in 1870, he became professor of English literature in Delhi College in 1873, tutor to the Raja of Rutlam in 1876, and principal of ... for his book Twenty-one Days in India (1878–1879), a satire upon Anglo-Indian society and modes of thought ...
Leonard Peltier - Early Life and Education
... paternal grandparents Alex and Mary Dubois-Peltier in the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa near Belcourt, North Dakota. 1953, at the age of nine, Leonard was enrolled at the Wahpeton Indian School in Wahpeton, North Dakota, an Indian boarding school run by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) ... He graduated at Wahpeton in May 1957, and attended the Flandreau Indian School in Flandreau, South Dakota ...
Tomato Sauce - Indian
... Indian curry, especially as it has been exported out of India, is recognizable for heavily spiced sauces, often made from a tomato base ...
Yona - Indian References
... In Indian sources, the usage of the words "Yona", "Yauna", "Yonaka", "Yavana" or "Javana" etc ... in relation to the Greek kingdoms which neighboured or sometimes occupied the Indian north-western territories (which is now Afghanistan or part of ...
Indian - Other
... Indian cuisine Indian (airline), a now defunct state-owned airline of India Indian Head cent Indian (card game) Indus (constellation), The Indian Indian (motor ...

More definitions of "Indian":

  • (noun): A native or inhabitant of India.

Famous quotes containing the word indian:

    This, it will be remembered, was the scene of Mrs. Rowlandson’s capture, and of other events in the Indian wars, but from this July afternoon, and under that mild exterior, those times seemed as remote as the irruption of the Goths. They were the dark age of New England.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    I think that the farmer displaces the Indian even because he redeems the meadow, and so makes himself stronger and in some respects more natural.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    We had not gone far before I was startled by seeing what I thought was an Indian encampment, covered with a red flag, on the bank, and exclaimed, “Camp!” to my comrades. I was slow to discover that it was a red maple changed by the frost.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)