Theory of Multiple Intelligences

The theory of multiple intelligences was proposed by Howard Gardner in his 1983 book Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences as a model of intelligence that differentiates intelligence into specific (primarily sensory) "modalities", rather than seeing it as dominated by a single general ability.

Gardner argues that there is a wide range of cognitive abilities, and that there are only very weak correlations among them. For example, the theory postulates that a child who learns to multiply easily is not necessarily more intelligent than a child who has more difficulty on this task. The child who takes more time to master multiplication may best learn to multiply through a different approach, may excel in a field outside mathematics, or may be looking at and understanding the multiplication process at a fundamentally deeper level. Such a fundamental understanding can result in slowness and can hide a mathematical intelligence potentially higher than that of a child who quickly memorizes the multiplication table despite possessing a less deep understanding of the process of multiplication.

Intelligence tests and psychometrics have generally found high correlations between different aspects of intelligence, rather than the low correlations which Gardner's theory predicts, supporting the prevailing theory of general intelligence rather than multiple intelligences (MI). The theory has been widely criticized by mainstream psychology for its lack of empirical evidence, and its dependence on subjective judgement. Some models of alternative education nevertheless promote the approaches suggested by the theory.

Read more about Theory Of Multiple Intelligences:  The Multiple Intelligences, Use in Education

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Theory Of Multiple Intelligences - Use in Education
... Gardner defines an intelligence as "biopsychological potential to process information that can be activated in a cultural setting to solve problems or create products ... Gardner believes that the purpose of schooling "should be to develop intelligences and to help people reach vocational and avocational goals that are ... that IQ tests focus mostly on logical and linguistic intelligence ...

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