Technology - Other Animal Species

Other Animal Species

The use of basic technology is also a feature of other animal species apart from humans. These include primates such as chimpanzees, some dolphin communities, and crows. Considering a more generic perspective of technology as ethology of active environmental conditioning and control, we can also refer to animal examples such as beavers and their dams, or bees and their honeycombs.

The ability to make and use tools was once considered a defining characteristic of the genus Homo. However, the discovery of tool construction among chimpanzees and related primates has discarded the notion of the use of technology as unique to humans. For example, researchers have observed wild chimpanzees utilising tools for foraging: some of the tools used include leaf sponges, termite fishing probes, pestles and levers. West African chimpanzees also use stone hammers and anvils for cracking nuts, as do capuchin monkeys of Boa Vista, Brazil.

Read more about this topic:  Technology

Other articles related to "animal, animals":

Nalgene - Controversy
... that it supported research "conducted only within the guidelines of the federal Animal Welfare Act and only when necessary." ...
Walter Burkert - Burkert's Theory of Sacrificial Ritual
... Salted-barley corns from the basket were thrown on the animal’s head and into the altar fire ... A lock of hair from the animal is then cut and burned, libation being poured on the altar with prayer ... proclaimed, the music of flutes begins and the animal is slain ...
Animal Behaviour
... Animal behaviour is the subject of The field of ethology Animal Behaviour, a scientific journal ...
Animal - Ethics
... Animals are regarded by philosophers like Peter Singer as ethical subjects ... Animal rights movements have worked to promote animal welfare ...

Famous quotes containing the words species and/or animal:

    An unjust law is itself a species of violence. Arrest for its breach is more so.
    Mohandas K. Gandhi (1869–1948)

    Certain anthropologists hold that man, having discovered tools, ceased to evolve biologically. Animals, never having discovered them, continue to fashion drills out of their beaks, oars out of their hind feet, wings out of their forefeet, suits of armor out of their hides, levers out of their horns, saws out of their teeth. Whether this be true or not, all authorities agree that man is the tool-using animal. It sets him off from the rest of the animal kingdom as drastically as does speech.
    Stuart Chase (1888–1985)