Tallahassee-St. Marks Historic Railroad Trail State Park

Tallahassee-St. Marks Historic Railroad Trail State Park is a rail trail and Florida State Park located on 16 miles (26 km) of the historic railbed of the Tallahassee Railroad, which ran between Tallahassee and St. Marks, Florida. The trail ends near the confluence of the St. Marks and Wakulla Rivers. The portion of the trail south of US 98 is designated as a portion of the Florida National Scenic Trail. A paved extension of the trail extends north for approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) into the City of Tallahassee.

Read more about Tallahassee-St. Marks Historic Railroad Trail State ParkRecreational Activities, Special Events, Hours, References and External Links

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