STCW

The International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (or STCW), 1978 sets qualification standards for masters, officers and watch personnel on seagoing merchant ships. STCW was adopted in 1978 by conference at the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in London, and entered into force in 1984. The Convention was significantly amended in 1995.

The 1978 STCW Convention was the first to establish basic requirements on training, certification and watchkeeping for seafarers on an international level. Previously the standards of training, certification and watchkeeping of officers and ratings were established by individual governments, usually without reference to practices in other countries. As a result standards and procedures varied widely, even though shipping is extremely international of nature.

The Convention prescribes minimum standards relating to training, certification and watchkeeping for seafarers which countries are obliged to meet or exceed.

The Convention did not deal with manning levels: IMO provisions in this area are covered by regulation 14 of Chapter V of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974, whose requirements are backed up by resolution A.890(21) Principles of safe manning, adopted by the IMO Assembly in 1999, which replaced an earlier resolution A.481(XII) adopted in 1981.

One especially important feature of the Convention is that it applies to ships of non-party States when visiting ports of States which are Parties to the Convention. Article X requires Parties to apply the control measures to ships of all flags to the extent necessary to ensure that no more favourable treatment is given to ships entitled to fly the flag of a State which is not a Party than is given to ships entitled to fly the flag of a State that is a Party.

The difficulties which could arise for ships of States which are not Parties to the Convention is one reason why the Convention has received such wide acceptance. By May 2013, the STCW Convention had 157 Parties, representing 99.2 percent of world shipping tonnage.

Read more about STCW1995 Revision, Manila Amendments

Other articles related to "stcw":

Merchant Mariner Credential
... or MMC is a credential issued by the United States Coast Guard in accordance with the STCW guidelines to United States seafarers to show evidence of a ... mariner license, Certificate of Registry, and STCW Certificate ... STCW endorsements would still be listed as STCW endorsements ...
Second Mate - Licensing - United States
... Third mates who attained their licenses after the implementation of STCW 95 have passed all the examination topics required for the second mate's ... Third mates who attained their licenses before STCW 95 must meet additional requirements ... progression path has been made too difficult since the requirements of STCW 95 have been enacted ...
RYA/MCA Yachtmaster Offshore Certificate of Competence - Commercial Endorsement
... STCW endorsement The Yachtmaster Offshore Certificate of Competence can subject to a medical fitness test and 4 additional courses Personal Survival techniques (RYA Basic Sea Survival certificate or STCW A ...
RYA/MCA Yachtmaster Ocean Certificate of Competence - Commercial Endorsement
... STCW endorsement The Yachtmaster Ocean Certificate of Competence can subject to a medical fitness test and 4 additional courses Personal Survival techniques (RYA Basic Sea Survival certificate or STCW A-V ...