Middle English Personal Pronouns

Below is a list of Middle English personal pronouns.

Personal pronouns in Middle English
Singular Plural
Nominative Oblique Genitive Nominative Oblique Genitive
First ik / ich / I me my(n) we us oure
Second þou / thou þee / thee þy(n) / thy(n) ȝe / ye ȝow / you ȝower / your
Third Impersonal hit hit / him his he
þei / they
hem
þem / them
her
þeir / their
Masculine he him his
Feminine ȝho / scho / sche hire hire

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