Medicinal Chemistry

Medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry are disciplines at the intersection of chemistry, especially synthetic organic chemistry, and pharmacology and various other biological specialties, where they are involved with design, chemical synthesis and development for market of pharmaceutical agents, or bio-active molecules (drugs).

Compounds used as medicines are most often organic compounds, which are often divided into the broad classes of small organic molecules (e.g., atorvastatin, fluticasone, clopidogrel) and "biologics" (infliximab, erythropoietin, insulin glargine), the latter of which are most often medicinal preparations of proteins (natural and recombinant antibodies, hormones, etc.). Inorganic and organometallic compounds are also useful as drugs (e.g., lithium and platinum-based agents such as lithium carbonate and cis-platin.

In particular, medicinal chemistry in its most common guise—focusing on small organic molecules—encompasses synthetic organic chemistry and aspects of natural products and computational chemistry in close combination with chemical biology, enzymology and structural biology, together aiming at the discovery and development of new therapeutic agents. Practically speaking, it involves chemical aspects of identification, and then systematic, thorough synthetic alteration of new chemical entities to make them suitable for therapeutic use. It includes synthetic and computational aspects of the study of existing drugs and agents in development in relation to their bioactivities (biological activities and properties), i.e., understanding their structure-activity relationships (SAR). Pharmaceutical chemistry is focused on quality aspects of medicines and aims to assure fitness for purpose of medicinal products.

At the biological interface, medicinal chemistry combines to form a set of highly interdisciplinary sciences, setting its organic, physical, and computational emphases alongside biological areas such as biochemistry, molecular biology, pharmacognosy and pharmacology, toxicology and veterinary and human medicine; these, with project management, statistics, and pharmaceutical business practices, systematically oversee altering identified chemical agents such that after pharmaceutical formulation, they are safe and efficacious, and therefore suitable for use in treatment of disease.

Read more about Medicinal ChemistryTraining in Medicinal Chemistry

Other articles related to "medicinal chemistry, chemistry":

Training in Medicinal Chemistry
... Medicinal chemistry is by nature an interdisciplinary science, and practitioners have a strong background in organic chemistry, which must eventually be coupled with a broad understanding ... Scientists in medicinal chemistry work are principally industrial scientists (but see following), working as part of an interdisciplinary team that uses their chemistry abilities, especially, their ... in chemistry ...
C. Robin Ganellin - Awards and Achievements
... He has served as the president of the IUPAC medicinal chemistry section, and he is currently the chair of the subcommittee on medicinal chemistry and ... over the years, both for his work on cimetidine and his research in other areas of medicinal chemistry ... He has received awards in medicinal chemistry from many organizations, such as the Royal Society of Chemistry, the American Chemical Society, the Society of Chemical ...
Bruce E. Maryanoff - Background and Contributions
... degree in chemistry in 1969, and a PhD degree in organic chemistry in 1972, both from Drexel University ... From 1972 to 1974 Maryanoff was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Chemistry at Princeton University ... also serving as Associate Editor for the journal ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters ...

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