Lester Piggott - in Popular Culture

In Popular Culture

The British music band James recorded a song named "Sometimes (Lester Piggott)" on their album Laid. It has a beat which is like a horse galloping. The outro on the original 12" of Sit Down also featured a falsetto voice singing the jockey's name.

The Hope and Anchor pub in Margate, Kent has been restyled with a horse racing theme and renamed Lester's after the famous jockey.

The Van Morrison song "In the Days Before Rock 'n Roll" also mentions Piggott by name: "When we let, then we bet / On Lester Piggott when we met / And we let the goldfish go"

In 1992, the Queen agreed, under pressure, to pay taxes. The satirical magazine Private Eye showed a picture of her talking on a telephone, asking for Lester Piggott.

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