Heat of Combustion

The heat of combustion is the energy released as heat when a compound undergoes complete combustion with oxygen under standard conditions. The chemical reaction is typically a hydrocarbon reacting with oxygen to form carbon dioxide, water and heat. It may be expressed with the quantities:

  • energy/mole of fuel (kJ/mol)
  • energy/mass of fuel
  • energy/volume of fuel

The heat of combustion is conventionally measured with a bomb calorimeter. It may also be calculated as the difference between the heat of formation of the products and reactants.

Read more about Heat Of CombustionHeating Value, Heat of Combustion Tables, Lower Heating Value For Some Organic Compounds (at 15.4°C), Higher Heating Values of Natural Gases From Various Sources

Other articles related to "heat of combustion, heat, combustion":

Glossary Of Fuel Cell Terms - H - Heat of Combustion
... The heat of combustion (ΔHc0) is the energy released as heat when a compound undergoes complete combustion with oxygen ... a hydrocarbon reacting with oxygen to form carbon dioxide, water and heat ...

Famous quotes containing the words heat of, combustion and/or heat:

    Coal is a portable climate. It carries the heat of the tropics to Labrador and the polar circle; and it is the means of transporting itself whithersoever it is wanted. Watt and Stephenson whispered in the ear of mankind their secret, that a half-ounce of coal will draw two tons a mile, and coal carries coal, by rail and by boat, to make Canada as warm as Calcutta, and with its comfort brings its industrial power.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    The night has been unruly. Where we lay,
    Our chimneys were blown down, and, as they say,
    Lamentings heard i’ th’ air, strange screams of death,
    And prophesying with accents terrible
    Of dire combustion and confused events,
    New-hatched to the woeful time.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    Friendship is evanescent in every man’s experience, and remembered like heat lightning in past summers.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)