A farm is an area of land, or, for aquaculture, lake, river or sea, including various structures, devoted primarily to the practice of producing and managing food (produce, grains, or livestock), fibres and, increasingly, fuel. It is the basic production facility in food production. Farms may be owned and operated by a single individual, family, community, corporation or a company. A farm can be a holding of any size from a fraction of a hectare to several thousand hectares.

Read more about FarmEtymology, Farming, Types of Farms, Ownership, Farm Buildings, Farm Equipment, Gallery

Other articles related to "farm":

Farm - Gallery
... A pastoral farm scene with a classic American red barn Michelsen Farmstead Provincial Historic Site of Alberta, Stirling Agricultural Village ...
Brook Farm - History - Beginnings
... The Ripleys chose to begin their experiment at a dairy farm owned by Charles and Maria Mayo Ellis in West Roxbury, Massachusetts, near the home of Theodore Parker ... money, including holding a meeting at Peabody's bookshop to raise $10,000 for the farm's initial purchase ... The 170-acre (0.69 km2) farm about eight miles (13 km) from Boston was described in a pamphlet as a "place of great natural beauty, combining a ...
Don Valley, Victoria
... A well known farm on Don Valley is Haining Farm, a 65-hectare cattle and dairy farm with Jersey and Friesian cows and other farm animals, located at the entrance of Don River into the Yarra River ...
Haltemprice - Background and Etymology
... Settlement continued at Haltemprice as 'Haltemprice Farm', the farm was occupied up to 1998, as of 2011 the farm building is derelict ...
Windfields Farm
... Windfields Farm was a six square kilometre (1,500 acre) thoroughbred horse breeding farm founded by businessman E ...

Famous quotes containing the word farm:

    His farm was “grounds,” and not a farm at all;
    His house among the local sheds and shanties
    Rose like a factor’s at a trading station.
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)

    Ants are so much like human beings as to be an embarrassment. They farm fungi, raise aphids as livestock, launch armies into war, use chemical sprays to alarm and confuse enemies, capture slaves, engage in child labor, exchange information ceaselessly. They do everything but watch television.
    Lewis Thomas (b. 1913)

    On the farm I had learned how to meet realities without suffering either mentally or physically. My initiative had never been blunted. I had freedom to succeed—freedom to fail. Life on the farm produces a kind of toughness.
    Bertha Van Hoosen (1863–1952)