Farm - Types of Farms

Types of Farms

A business producing tree fruits or nuts is called an orchard; a vineyard produces grapes. The stable is used for operations principally involved in the training of horses. Stud and commercial farms breed and produce other animals and livestock. A farm that is primarily used for the production of milk and dairy is a dairy farm. A market garden or truck farm is a farm that grows vegetables, but little or no grain. Additional specialty farms include fish farms, which raise fish in captivity as a food source, and tree farms, which grow trees for sale for transplant, lumber, or decorative use. A plantation is usually a large farm or estate, on which cotton, tobacco, coffee or sugar cane, are cultivated, often by resident laborers.

Read more about this topic:  Farm

Other articles related to "types of, types, type":

Netwar - Network Structures
... Arquilla and Ronfeldt point to three basic types of networks that may be used by netwar actors Chain network – typified by smuggling networks, where end-to-end exchanges (information ... Netwar actors may also take on hybrid forms as well, blending different types of networks and hierarchies ... the same group may be networked to each other through different types of network structures ...
Types of Graphemes
... The principal types of graphemes are logograms, which represent words or morphemes (for example, Chinese characters, or the ampersand representing the English word and also ... For a full discussion of the different types, see Writing system Functional classification of writing systems ...
Prolog - Extensions - Types
... Attempts to introduce types date back to the 1980s, and as of 2008 there are still attempts to extend Prolog with types ... Type information is useful not only for type safety but also for reasoning about Prolog programs ...

Famous quotes containing the words types of, farms and/or types:

    ... there are two types of happiness and I have chosen that of the murderers. For I am happy. There was a time when I thought I had reached the limit of distress. Beyond that limit, there is a sterile and magnificent happiness.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    For all symbols are fluxional; all language is vehicular and transitive, and is good, as ferries and horses are, for conveyance, not as farms and houses are, for homestead.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Our major universities are now stuck with an army of pedestrian, toadying careerists, Fifties types who wave around Sixties banners to conceal their record of ruthless, beaverlike tunneling to the top.
    Camille Paglia (b. 1947)