Crystals

Some articles on crystals, crystal:

Lia Halloran - The Only Way Out Is Through
... The Naica mine, where the crystals reach lengths of 60 feet, are inaccessible to most people as the conditions are extreme ... To create these large scale paintings of the crystals Halloran worked from a variety of photographs in the media as well as from scientific drawings ... In some of the smaller paintings there are figures perched on the crystals to demonstrate their scale ...
SCR-536 - Components
... BX-48 box for spare crystals and tubes (5-sets) BX-49 box for spare crystals and tubes (24-sets) BG-162 bag for batteries (BA-37, BA-38) CH-146 chest ...
Crystalline Cohomology - Crystals
... A crystal on the site Cris(X/S) is a sheaf F of OX/S modules that is rigid in the following sense for any map f between objects T, T′ of Cris(X/S), the natural map from f*F ... An example of a crystal is the sheaf OX/S ... The term crystal attached to the theory, explained in Grothendieck's letter to Tate (1966), was a metaphor inspired by certain properties of algebraic differential equations ...
Sivaramakrishna Chandrasekhar - Publications and Honors
... The year 1977 also saw the publication of Chandrasekhar’s book on liquid crystals by the Cambridge University Press ... Many stalwarts in the field of liquid crystals like Glen H ... the Nobel Prize in 1991, partly for his work on liquid crystals) participated in this conference ...
Mollusc Shell - Formation
... This organic framework controls the formation of calcium carbonate crystals, (never phosphate with the questionable exception of Cobcrephora), and dictates when and where crystals start and stop ... forms the scaffold that directs crystallization, and the deposition and rate of crystals is also controlled by hormones produced by the mollusc ... than encouraging, carbonate deposition although it does act as a nucleating point for the crystals and controls their shape, orientation and polymorph, it also terminates their growth once they reach the ...

Famous quotes containing the word crystals:

    It is clear that everybody interested in science must be interested in world 3 objects. A physical scientist, to start with, may be interested mainly in world 1 objects—say crystals and X-rays. But very soon he must realize how much depends on our interpretation of the facts, that is, on our theories, and so on world 3 objects. Similarly, a historian of science, or a philosopher interested in science must be largely a student of world 3 objects.
    Karl Popper (1902–1994)