Bleaching of Wood Pulp

Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. The main use of wood pulp is to make paper where whiteness (similar to but not exactly the same as "brightness") is an important characteristic. The processes and chemistry described in this article are also applicable to the bleaching of non-wood pulps, such as those made from bamboo or kenaf.

Read more about Bleaching Of Wood PulpPaper Brightness, Bleaching Mechanical Pulps, Bleaching of Recycled Pulp, Bleaching Chemical Pulps, Environmental Considerations

Other articles related to "bleaching of wood pulp, bleaching, pulp, bleaching of, pulps":

Bleaching Of Wood Pulp - Environmental Considerations
... See also Environmental issues with paper Bleaching mechanical pulp is not a major cause for environmental concern since most of the organic material is ... However, the bleaching of chemical pulps has the potential to cause significant environmental damage, primarily through the release of organic materials into waterways ... Pulp mills are almost always located near large bodies of water because they require substantial quantities of water for their processes ...

Famous quotes containing the words pulp, bleaching and/or wood:

    For men tied fast to the absolute, bled of their differences, drained of their dreams by authoritarian leeches until nothing but pulp is left, become a massive, sick Thing whose sheer weight is used ruthlessly by ambitious men. Here is the real enemy of the people: our own selves dehumanized into “the masses.” And where is the David who can slay this giant?
    Lillian Smith (1897–1966)

    Worn down by the hoofs of millions of half-wild Texas cattle driven along it to the railheads in Kansas, the trail was a bare, brown, dusty strip hundreds of miles long, lined with the bleaching bones of longhorns and cow ponies. Here and there a broken-down chuck wagon or a small mound marking the grave of some cowhand buried by his partners “on the lone prairie” gave evidence to the hardships of the journey.
    —For the State of Kansas, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    Old Abe is much better looking than I expected & younger looking. He shook hands like a good fellow—working hard at it like a man sawing wood at so much per cord.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)