Base Excision Repair

In biochemistry and genetics, base excision repair (BER) is a cellular mechanism that repairs damaged DNA throughout the cell cycle. It is responsible primarily for removing small, non-helix-distorting base lesions from the genome. The related nucleotide excision repair pathway repairs bulky helix-distorting lesions. BER is important for removing damaged bases that could otherwise cause mutations by mispairing or lead to breaks in DNA during replication. BER is initiated by DNA glycosylases, which recognize and remove specific damaged or inappropriate bases, forming AP sites. These are then cleaved by an AP endonuclease. The resulting single-strand break can then be processed by either short-patch (where a single nucleotide is replaced) or long-patch BER (where 2-10 new nucleotides are synthesized).

Read more about Base Excision RepairLesions Processed By BER, The Choice Between Long-patch and Short-patch Repair, Links Between BER and Cancer

Other articles related to "base excision repair, repair, base, excision repair":

Base Excision Repair - Links Between BER and Cancer
... Defects in a variety of DNA repair pathways lead to cancer predisposition, and BER appears to follow this pattern ...
Oxoguanine Glycosylase
... acute inflammatory response • DNA repairbase-excision repairbase-excision repair, AP site formation • nucleotide-excision repair • regulation of transcription ... It is involved in base excision repair ...

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