Basal - Science

Science

  • Basal (anatomy), an anatomical term of location for features associated with the base of an organism or structure
  • Basal (medicine), a minimal level that is necessary for health or life, such as a minimum insulin dose
  • Basal (phylogenetics), the "base" or earliest clade to branch in a larger clade

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Other articles related to "science":

Science and Society - Political Usage
... See also Politicization of science Many issues damage the relationship of science to the media and the use of science and scientific arguments by politicians ... or think tank makes it their only goal to cast doubt on supported science because it conflicts with political agendas ...
J. Robert Oppenheimer - Final Years
... and academics to establish what would eventually become the World Academy of Art and Science in 1960 ... he attend the first Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs in 1957 ... knowledge in a world in which the freedom of science to exchange ideas was more and more hobbled by political concerns ...
Vannevar Bush Award
... The National Science Board established the Vannevar Bush Award (/væˈniːvər/ van-NEE-vər) in 1980 to honor Dr ... The annual award recognizes an individual who, through public service activities in science and technology, has made an outstanding "contribution toward the welfare of mankind and the Nation ... adviser to Presidents, and the force behind the establishment of the National Science Foundation ...
Vannevar Bush
28, 1974) was an American engineer, inventor and science administrator known for his work on analog computers, for his role as an initiator and administrator ... thousand leading American scientists in the application of science to warfare ... II, when he was in effect the first presidential science advisor ...

Famous quotes containing the word science:

    The great pagan world of which Egypt and Greece were the last living terms ... once had a vast and perhaps perfect science of its own, a science in terms of life. In our era this science crumbled into magic and charlatanry. But even wisdom crumbles.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    May we not assure ourselves that whatever woman’s thought and study shall embrace will thereby receive a new inspiration, that she will save science from materialism, and art from a gross realism; that the “eternal womanly shall lead upward and onward”?
    Louisa Parsons Hopkins, U.S. scientist and author. As quoted in The Fair Women, ch. 16, by Jeanne Madeline Weimann (1981)

    It is clear that everybody interested in science must be interested in world 3 objects. A physical scientist, to start with, may be interested mainly in world 1 objects—say crystals and X-rays. But very soon he must realize how much depends on our interpretation of the facts, that is, on our theories, and so on world 3 objects. Similarly, a historian of science, or a philosopher interested in science must be largely a student of world 3 objects.
    Karl Popper (1902–1994)