Agrippa (a Book of The Dead)

Agrippa (a book of the dead) is a work of art created by speculative fiction novelist William Gibson, artist Dennis Ashbaugh and publisher Kevin Begos Jr. in 1992. The work consists of a 300-line semi-autobiographical electronic poem by Gibson, embedded in an artist's book by Ashbaugh. Gibson's text focused on the ethereal nature of memories (the title is taken from a photo album). Its principal notoriety arose from the fact that the poem, stored on a 3.5" floppy disk, was programmed to encrypt itself after a single use; similarly, the pages of the artist's book were treated with photosensitive chemicals, effecting the gradual fading of the words and images from the book's first exposure to light.

Read more about Agrippa (a Book Of The Dead):  Origin and Concept, Release and Replication, Content and Editions, The Poem, Critical Reception and Influence

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Agrippa (a Book Of The Dead) - Critical Reception and Influence
... Agrippa was extremely influential—as a sigil for the artistic community to appreciate the potential of electronic media—for the extent to which it entered public consciousness ... It caused a fierce controversy in the art world, among museums and among libraries ...

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