142nd Field Artillery Regiment (United States) - Reorganization Following World War II

Reorganization Following World War II

Following World War II, the 142nd Field Artillery Group was reorganized in the Arkansas Guard, consisting of 6 battalions, 3 artillery battalions and 3 antiaircraft artillery battalions.

Headquarters Company Station
142nd Field Artillery Group Headquarters and Headquarters Battery Fayetteville
709th FA Battalion Headquarters and Headquarters Battery Paragould
Battery A Rector
Battery B Augusta
Battery C Piggott
Service Battery, 437th FA Wynne
936th Field Artillery Battalion Headquarters and Headquarters Battery Fayetteville
Battery A Bentonville
Battery B Berryville
Battery C Rogers
Service Battery Harrison
Medical Detachment Fayetteville
937th Field Artillery Battalion Headquarters and Headquarters Battery Fort Smith
Battery A Mena
Battery B Paris
Battery C Ozark
Service Battery Mena
Medical Detachment Ozark
151st Anti Aircraft Artillery Battalion Headquarters and Headquarters Battery Harrison
Battery A Mountain Home
Battery B Berryville
Battery C Marshall
Battery D Harrison
Medical Detachment Harrison
326th Anti Aircraft Artillery Battalion Headquarters and Headquarters Battery West Memphis
Battery A Marked Tree
Battery B West Memphis
Battery C Harrisburg
Battery D West Helena
Medical Detachment Marked Tree
327th Anti Aircraft Artillery Battalion Headquarters and Headquarters Battery Jonesboro
Battery A Jonesboro
Battery B Jonesboro
Battery C Jonesboro
Battery D Jonesboro
Medical Detachment Jonesboro

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