What is trip?

  • (verb): Miss a step and fall or nearly fall.
    Synonyms: stumble
    See also — Additional definitions below

Trip

Trip may refer to travel, a vacation, or a psychedelic experience. It is also an informal description for a circuit breaker or its action. Trip may also refer to:

Read more about Trip.

Some articles on trip:

Trip - Other Uses
... TRIP Database a scientific search engine for evidence based medicine Trip (drink), a Finnish brand of juice TRIP Linhas AĆ©reas, a Brazilian airline TRIPS, the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of ...

More definitions of "trip":

  • (noun): An exciting or stimulting experience.
    Synonyms: head trip
  • (noun): A light or nimble tread.
    Example: "He heard the trip of women's feet overhead"
  • (verb): Make a trip for pleasure.
    Synonyms: travel, jaunt
  • (noun): An unintentional but embarrassing blunder.
    Example: "He recited the whole poem without a single trip"; "he arranged his robes to avoid a trip-up later"
    Synonyms: trip-up, stumble, misstep
  • (noun): A catch mechanism that acts as a switch.
    Synonyms: tripper
  • (noun): A journey for some purpose (usually including the return).
    Example: "He took a trip to the shopping center"
  • (noun): An accidental misstep threatening (or causing) a fall.
    Synonyms: slip
  • (noun): A hallucinatory experience induced by drugs.
    Example: "An acid trip"
  • (verb): Cause to stumble.
    Synonyms: trip up

Famous quotes containing the word trip:

    It’s like driving a car at night. You never see further than your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.
    —E.L. (Edgar Lawrence)

    Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899–1977)

    When the red-cheeked, dancing girls, April and May, trip home to the wintry, misanthropic woods; even the barest, ruggedest, most thunder-cloven old oak will at least send forth some few green sprouts, to welcome such glad-hearted visitants.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)