Latency

Latency or latent may refer to:

Read more about Latency:  Electronics, Biology, Music, Other Uses

Other articles related to "latency":

Sleep Onset Latency - Home Testing of Sleep Latency
... For home-testing for an unusually low sleep latency and potential sleep deprivation, the authors point to a technique developed by Nathaniel Kleitman, the "father of sleep research." The subject reclines in a ... The number of minutes passed is the sleep onset latency at that particular hour on that particular day ... these evaluations at night when sleep onset latency can naturally be lower, particularly in older people ...
Low Latency (capital Markets) - Latency Measurement - Terminology - Latency Jitter
... There are many use cases where predictability of latency in message delivery is as, if not more important than a low average latency ... This latency predictability is also referred to as Low Latency Jitter and describes a narrow deviation of latencies around the mean latency measurement ...
Sniperhill - Criticisms - Latency
... Network latency is the delay between requesting data and getting a response, or in the case of one-way communication, between the actual moment of broadcast and the ... satellite communications experience higher latency than that of ground-based communications due to the signal having to travel 22,000 miles out into space to a satellite in ...
Latency - Other Uses
... Latency stage, a term coined by Sigmund Freud for a stage in a child's psychosexual development Nuclear latency, the condition of a country capable of developing nuclear ...
Low Latency (capital Markets)
... Low latency is a topic within capital markets, where the proliferation of algorithmic trading requires firms to react to market events faster than the competition to increase profitability of trades ... To demonstrate the value that clients put on latency, a large global investment bank has stated that every millisecond lost results in $100m per annum in lost ... Many organisations are using the words “ultra low latency” to describe latencies of under 1 millisecond, but really what is considered low today will no doubt be considered unacceptable in a few years ...