What is dissolution?

  • (noun): Separation into component parts.
    Synonyms: disintegration
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on dissolution:

Woolwich Steam Packet Company - Main Excursion Vessels
... service from Greenock, but sold to Keith Campbell in 1871 after the dissolution the Greenock company ... Greenock, but sold to Keith Campbell in 1871 after the dissolution the Greenock company ... Built for the new Gareloch service from Greenock, but sold to Keith Campbell in 1871 after the dissolution the Greenock company ...

More definitions of "dissolution":

  • (noun): The termination of a relationship.
    Synonyms: breakup
  • (noun): The process of going into solution.
    Synonyms: dissolving
  • (noun): The termination of a meeting.
    Synonyms: adjournment

Famous quotes containing the word dissolution:

    The most dangerous aspect of present-day life is the dissolution of the feeling of individual responsibility. Mass solitude has done away with any difference between the internal and the external, between the intellectual and the physical.
    Eugenio Montale (1896–1981)

    We are threatened with suffering from three directions: from our own body, which is doomed to decay and dissolution and which cannot even do without pain and anxiety as warning signals; from the external world, which may rage against us with overwhelming and merciless forces of destruction; and finally from our relations to other men. The suffering which comes from this last source is perhaps more painful than any other.
    Sigmund Freud (1856–1939)

    ...that absolutely everything beloved and cherished of the bourgeoisie, the conservative, the cowardly, and the impotent—the State, family life, secular art and science—was consciously or unconsciously hostile to the religious idea, to the Church, whose innate tendency and permanent aim was the dissolution of all existing worldly orders, and the reconstitution of society after the model of the ideal, the communistic City of God.
    Thomas Mann (1875–1955)