Reuse

To reuse is to use an item again after it has been used. This includes conventional reuse where the item is used again for the same function, and new-life reuse where it is used for a different function. In contrast, recycling is the breaking down of the used item into raw materials which are used to make new items. By taking useful products and exchanging them, without reprocessing, reuse help save time, money, energy, and resources. In broader economic terms, reuse offers quality products to people and organizations with limited means, while generating jobs and business activity that contribute to the economy.

Historically, financial motivation was one of the main drivers of reuse. In the developing world this driver can lead to very high levels of reuse, however rising wages and consequent consumer demand for the convenience of disposable products has made the reuse of low value items such as packaging uneconomic in richer countries, leading to the demise of many reuse programs. Current environmental awareness is gradually changing attitudes and regulations, such as the new packaging regulations, are gradually beginning to reverse the situation.

One example of conventional reuse is the doorstep delivery of milk in refillable bottles; other examples include the retreading of tires and the use of returnable/reusable plastic boxes, shipping containers, instead of single-use corrugated fiberboard boxes.

Read more about Reuse:  Advantages and Disadvantages, Measuring The Impact of Reuse, Reuse Metrics, Internalized Environmental Costs, Comparison To Recycling, Reuse of Information

Other articles related to "reuse":

Creative Reuse
... Creative reuse is the process of taking used or recycled materials and turning them into creative pieces of art, home decoration, or other useful items ... with use of throwaways from commercial offices, creative reuse projects can be big or small and can be made from anything that would otherwise have been thrown away ... Creative reuse can be items or artwork that are sold for profit, for non-profit causes, or just for fun ...
Reuse of Information
... Software reuse grew out of the standard subroutine libraries of the 1960s ... Reuse of information has a tremendous return on investment for organizations whose documentation is translated into many languages ... dozens of languages for retrieval and reuse ...
Adaptive Reuse - By Location - Europe
... In Europe, the main forms of adaptive reuse have been around former palaces and unused residences of the different European royal families into publicly accessible galleries and museums ... In Paris, France, the most famous example of adaptive reuse is the Musée du Louvre, a former palace built in the late 12th century under Philip II and opened to the public as a museum in 1793 ... The Tate Modern, also in London is another example of adaptive reuse in the European continent, unlike other adaptive reuse galleries in Europe, the Tate Modern takes full advantage of the site of the ...
Sanitized - Wastewater - Wastewater Treatment - Reuse of Wastewater
... The reuse of untreated wastewater in irrigated agriculture is common in developing countries ... The reuse of treated wastewater in landscaping, especially on golf courses, irrigated agriculture and for industrial use is becoming increasingly widespread ...
Manchester Racecourse - Reuse
... In 1973 the University of Salford bought the majority of the site and its buildings for £46,000 ... The land was used to construct a student village.53°29′58″N 2°16′31″W / 53.4994°N 2.2752°W / 53.4994 -2.2752Coordinates 53°29′58″N 2°16′31″W / 53.4994°N 2.2752°W / 53.4994 -2.2752 The Members' Stand was retained to became an entertainment venue known as the Pavilion or the Pav ...