Ibprofen

Ibprofen

Ibuprofen (INN) ( /ˈaɪbjuːproʊfɛn/ or /aɪbjuːˈproʊfən/ EYE-bew-PROH-fən; from iso-butyl-propanoic-phenolic acid) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used for pain relief, fever reduction, and swelling.

Ibuprofen has an antiplatelet effect, though relatively mild and somewhat short-lived compared with aspirin or prescription antiplatelet drugs. In general, ibuprofen also acts as a vasoconstrictor. Ibuprofen is a 'core' medicine in the World Health Organization's Model List of Essential Medicines necessary to meet the minimum medical needs of a basic healthcare system.

Ibuprofen was derived from propanoic acid by the research arm of Boots Group during the 1960s and patented in 1961. Originally marketed as Brufen, ibuprofen is available under a variety of popular trademarks, including Motrin, Nurofen, Advil, and Nuprin.

Read more about Ibprofen:  Medical Uses, Adverse Effects, Mechanism of Action, Chemistry, History, Availability, Research

Other articles related to "ibprofen":

Ibprofen - Research
... As with other NSAIDs, ibuprofen may be useful in the treatment of severe orthostatic hypotension (low blood pressure when standing up) ... In some studies, ibuprofen showed superior results compared to a placebo in the prophylaxis of Alzheimer's disease, when given in low doses over a long time ...