Hair - Function

Function

Many mammals have fur and other hairs that serve different functions. Hair provides thermal regulation and camouflage for many animals; for others it provides signals to other animals such as warnings, mating, or other communicative displays; and for some animals hair provides defensive functions and, rarely, even offensive protection. Hair also has a sensory function, extending the sense of touch beyond the surface of the skin. Guard hairs give warnings that may trigger a recoiling reaction.

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Other articles related to "function":

Integral - Extensions - Multiple Integration
... In general, an integral over a set E of a function f is written Here x need not be a real number, but can be another suitable quantity, for instance, a vector in R3 ... Just as the definite integral of a positive function of one variable represents the area of the region between the graph of the function and the x-axis, the double integral of a positive function of ... The same volume can be obtained via the triple integral — the integral of a function in three variables — of the constant function f(x, y, z) = 1 over the above ...
Integral - Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
... and integration are inverse operations if a continuous function is first integrated and then differentiated, the original function is retrieved ... fundamental theorem of calculus, allows one to compute integrals by using an antiderivative of the function to be integrated ...

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