ES - Science

Science

  • E-skip, or sporadic E, a concept related to broadcast frequencies
  • Edison screw, a kind of lightbulb socket whose sizes are preceded with ES (e.g. ES14).
  • Einsteinium, a synthetic chemical element (Es)
  • Embryonic stem cell, a type of pluripotent stem cell derived from an early-stage embryo
  • Esophageal sphincter (disambiguation)
  • Exasecond, an SI unit of time
  • Exasiemens, an SI unit of electric conductance

Read more about this topic:  ES

Other articles related to "science":

J. Robert Oppenheimer - Final Years
... to establish what would eventually become the World Academy of Art and Science in 1960 ... he attend the first Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs in 1957 ... the difficulty of managing the power of knowledge in a world in which the freedom of science to exchange ideas was more and more hobbled by political concerns ...
Vannevar Bush Award
... The National Science Board established the Vannevar Bush Award (/væˈniːvər/ van-NEE-vər) in 1980 to honor Dr ... recognizes an individual who, through public service activities in science and technology, has made an outstanding "contribution toward the welfare of mankind and the Nation ... Presidents, and the force behind the establishment of the National Science Foundation ...
Science and Society - Political Usage
... See also Politicization of science Many issues damage the relationship of science to the media and the use of science and scientific arguments by politicians ... organization or think tank makes it their only goal to cast doubt on supported science because it conflicts with political agendas ...
Vannevar Bush
... June 28, 1974) was an American engineer, inventor and science administrator known for his work on analog computers, for his role as an initiator and ... thousand leading American scientists in the application of science to warfare ... he was in effect the first presidential science advisor ...

Famous quotes containing the word science:

    We have lost the art of living; and in the most important science of all, the science of daily life, the science of behaviour, we are complete ignoramuses. We have psychology instead.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    It is clear that everybody interested in science must be interested in world 3 objects. A physical scientist, to start with, may be interested mainly in world 1 objects—say crystals and X-rays. But very soon he must realize how much depends on our interpretation of the facts, that is, on our theories, and so on world 3 objects. Similarly, a historian of science, or a philosopher interested in science must be largely a student of world 3 objects.
    Karl Popper (1902–1994)

    He has been described as “an innkeeper who hated his guests, a philosopher, and poet who left no written record of his thought, a despiser of women who gave all he had to one, an aristocrat, a proletarian, a pagan, an arcadian, an atheist, a lover of beauty, and, inadvertently, the stepfather of domestic science in America.”
    —Administration in the State of Colo, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)