Aid To Families With Dependent Children

Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) was a federal assistance program in effect from 1935 to 1996 created by the Social Security Act and administered by the United States Department of Health and Human Services that provided financial assistance to children of single parents or whose families had low or no income.

This program grew from a minor part of the social security system to a significant system of welfare administered by the states with federal funding. However, it was criticized for offering incentives for women to have children, and for providing disincentives for women to join the workforce. In 1996, AFDC was replaced by the more restrictive Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program.

Read more about Aid To Families With Dependent Children:  History, Criticism, Reform

Other articles related to "aid to families with dependent children, families, aid":

Aid To Families With Dependent Children - Reform
... replacement program was reinforced by calling AFDC's successor Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) ... Too many have been denied aid unfairly, creating a false impression that the number of people who need help has decreased." ...

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