Who is Walter Lippmann?

  • (noun): United States journalist (1889-1974).
    Synonyms: Lippmann

Walter Lippmann

Walter Lippmann (September 23, 1889 – December 14, 1974) was an American public intellectual, writer, reporter, and political commentator famous for being among the first to introduce the concept of Cold War; he coined the term stereotype in the modern psychological meaning as well. Lippmann was twice awarded (1958 and 1962) a Pulitzer Prize for his syndicated newspaper column, "Today and Tomorrow".

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Colloque Walter Lippmann
... The Walter Lippman Colloquium, in French Colloque Walter Lippmann, was a conference of intellectuals organized in Paris in August 1938 by French philosopher Louis Rougier ... The colloquium was named after American journalist Walter Lippmann ... Participants included Walter Lippmann himself, German Ordoliberals such as Wilhelm Röpke and Alexander Rüstow, Austrian School theorists such as Friedrich ...

Famous quotes containing the words walter lippmann and/or lippmann:

    The effort to calculate exactly what the voters want at each particular moment leaves out of account the fact that when they are troubled the thing the voters most want is to be told what to want.
    Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)

    Success makes men rigid and they tend to exalt stability over all the other virtues; tired of the effort of willing they become fanatics about conservatism.
    —Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)