Who is rose wilder lane?

Rose Wilder Lane

Rose Wilder Lane (December 5, 1886 – October 30, 1968) was an American journalist, travel writer, novelist, and political theorist. She is noted (with Ayn Rand and Isabel Paterson) as one of the founders of the American libertarian movement.

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Some articles on rose wilder lane:

Rose Wilder Lane - In The Media
... Lane was portrayed in the television adaptations of Little House on the Prairie by Twins Jennifer and Michele Steffin Terra Allen (part 1) and Skye McCole Bartusiak, Christina ... There are eight novels written by Roger Lea MacBride, telling of Lane's childhood and early youth ... represented, as MacBride was a close friend of Lane's ...
Laura Ingalls Wilder - Works
... book On the Way Home (1962, published posthumously) – a diary of the Wilders' move from De Smet, South Dakota to Mansfield, Missouri, edited and added to by Rose Wilder Lane ... posthumously) West from Home (1974, published posthumously) – Wilder's letters to Almanzo while visiting Lane in San Francisco The Road Back (Part of A Little House Traveler Writings ...

Famous quotes containing the words wilder lane, lane, rose and/or wilder:

    There is a city myth that country life was isolated and lonely; the truth is that farmers and their families then had a richer social life than they have now. They enjoyed a society organic, satisfying and whole, not mixed and thinned with the life of town, city and nation as it now is.
    —Rose Wilder Lane (1886–1965)

    Making the best of things is ... a damn poor way of dealing with them.... My whole life has been a series of escapes from that quicksand [ellipses in source].
    —Rose Wilder Lane (1886–1968)

    Rose of all Roses, Rose of all the World!
    You, too, have come where the dim tides are hurled
    Upon the wharves of sorrow, and heard ring
    The bell that calls us on; the sweet far thing.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    There is a city myth that country life was isolated and lonely; the truth is that farmers and their families then had a richer social life than they have now. They enjoyed a society organic, satisfying and whole, not mixed and thinned with the life of town, city and nation as it now is.
    —Rose Wilder Lane (1886–1965)