Who is Marshall McLuhan?

Marshall McLuhan

Herbert Marshall McLuhan, CC (July 21, 1911 – December 31, 1980) was a Canadian philosopher of communication theory. His work is viewed as one of the cornerstones of the study of media theory, as well as having practical applications in the advertising and television industries.

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Some articles on Marshall McLuhan:

Canada Post Millennium Stamps - February 2000 - The Millennium Collection, Canada's Great Thinkers
... Marshall McLuhan Edmonton-born Marshall McLuhan remains a cultural icon as Canada's pioneer pop philosopher and oracle of the electronic age ... by Stacey Zabolotney and based on an illustration by Stephanie Carter 17 February 2000 Marshall McLuhan The Man with a Message 46 cents Ashton-Potter Canada Ltd ...
Marshall McLuhan - Legacy
... After the publication of Understanding Media, McLuhan received an astonishing amount of publicity, making him perhaps the most publicized English teacher in the twentieth century and arguably the ... who used personal profits to fund their practice of "genius scouting." Much enamoured with McLuhan's work, Feigen and Gossage arranged for McLuhan to meet with editors of ... Marchand reports that, as a direct consequence of these meetings, McLuhan was offered the use of an office in the headquarters of both Time and ...
Marshall Mc Luhan Bibliography - Articles
... Hook reviewed by Herbert Marshall McLuhan ... Edmund Carpenter and Marshall McLuhan ... Marshall McLuhan and Barrington Nevitt ...

Famous quotes containing the words marshall mcluhan, mcluhan and/or marshall:

    The car has become the carapace, the protective and aggressive shell, of urban and suburban man.
    Marshall McLuhan (1911–1980)

    Our “Age of Anxiety” is, in great part, the result of trying to do today’s job with yesterday’s tools—with yesterday’s concepts.
    —Marshall McLuhan (1911–1980)

    Knowing how beleaguered working mothers truly are—knowing because I am one of them—I am still amazed at how one need only say “I work” to be forgiven all expectation, to be assigned almost a handicapped status that no decent human being would burden further with demands. “I work” has become the universally accepted excuse, invoked as an all-purpose explanation for bowing out, not participating, letting others down, or otherwise behaving inexcusably.
    —Melinda M. Marshall (20th century)