Timeline of The Irish Civil War

This is a timeline of the Irish Civil War, which took place between June 1922 and May 1923. It followed the Irish War of Independence (1919–1921), and accompanied the establishment of the Irish Free State as an entity independent from the United Kingdom.

The conflict was waged between two opposing groups of Irish nationalists: the forces of the new Irish Free State, who supported the Anglo-Irish Treaty under which the state was established, and the Republican opposition, for whom the Treaty represented a betrayal of the Irish Republic.

The Government of the Irish Free State (established as a Provisional Government in January 1922 and as a full government in December 1922) was ultimately victorious. The anti-Treaty forces called a ceasefire in April 1923 and ordered their men to "dump arms" in May 1923.

The war involved both conventional warfare (late June–August 1922) when the Free State forces took the major towns and cities, and then a longer period of guerrilla warfare (September 1922–April 1923) as the anti-Treaty forces were gradually brought to a standstill.

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