Thickening

In cooking, thickening is the process of increasing the viscosity of a liquid either by reduction, or by the addition of a thickening agent, typically containing starch.

Desserts are often thickened with sago, tapioca, gelatin or a gelatin substitute such as agar. Soups, sauces and stews are more often thickened with a starchy ingredient like cornstarch, arrowroot or wheat flour, or a fat and flour mixture such as roux or beurre maniƩ. More rarely, savory dishes may be thickened with blood.

Other articles related to "thickening, thickenings":

Textile Printing - Selecting Thickening Agents - Starch Paste
... This is made from wheat starch, cold water, and olive oil, and boiled for thickening ... Starch was the most extensively used of all the thickenings ... salts convert it into dextrine, thus diminishing its viscosity or thickening power ...
Benign Nephrosclerosis - Morphology
... Microscopically, the basic anatomic change consists of hyaline thickening of the walls of the small arteries and arterioles (hyaline arteriolosclerosis) ... this appears as a homogeneous, pink hyaline thickening at the expense of the vessel lumina, with loss of underlying cellular detail ... of internal elastic lamina along with fibrous thickening of the media (fibroelastic hyperplasia) and the subintima ...
Irvingia - Products
... The press cake can be used as cattle feed or as thickening agent for soup ... Seeds can be ground or crushed and used as thickening and flavoring agent in soups and stews ... This food-thickening property is thought to be caused by mucilaginous polysaccharides, which become more viscous with cooking and is called "drawability" ...
Burgoo - North America
... such as lima beans, corn, okra, and potatoes and a thickening agent, such as cornmeal, ground beans, whole wheat, or potato starch ... Traditionally, soup bones were added for taste and thickening ... with meat first, vegetables next, and thickening agents as necessary ...