Soviet Literature

Soviet Literature

Russian literature refers to the literature of Russia or its émigrés, and to the Russian-language literature of several independent nations once a part of what was historically Russia or the Soviet Union.

Roots of Russian literature can be traced to Middle Ages, when epics and chronicles in Old Russian were composed. In the Age of enlightenment, literature had grown in importance, and from the early 1830s, Russian literature underwent an astounding golden age in both poetry, prose, and drama. After the Revolution of 1917, Russian literature split into Soviet and white émigré parts. Soviet Union assured universal literacy and highly developed book printing industry, but also carried out ideological censorship.

Russian authors significantly contributed almost to all known genres of the literature. Russia had five Nobel Prize in literature laureates. As of 2011, Russia was the fourth largest book producer in the world in terms of published titles. A popular folk saying claims Russians are "the world's most reading nation".

Read more about Soviet Literature:  Early History, 18th Century, Golden Age, Silver Age, 20th Century, Post-Soviet Era, Abroad, Themes in Russian Books, Russian Nobel Prize in Literature Winners

Famous quotes containing the words literature and/or soviet:

    The literature of the inner life is very largely a record of struggle with the inordinate passions of the social self.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864–1929)

    They were right. The Soviet régime is not the embodiment of evil as you think in the West. They have laws and I broke them. I hate tea and they love tea. Who is wrong?
    Alexander Zinoviev (b. 1922)