Privacy - Types of Privacy

Types of Privacy

The term "privacy" means many things in different contexts. Different people, cultures, and nations have a wide variety of expectations about how much privacy a person is entitled to or what constitutes an invasion of privacy.

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Other articles related to "types of, types, types of privacy, of privacy, type":

Types of Graphemes
... The principal types of graphemes are logograms, which represent words or morphemes (for example, Chinese characters, or the ampersand representing the English ... For a full discussion of the different types, see Writing system Functional classification of writing systems ...
Types of Privacy - Spiritual and Intellectual
... The earliest legislative development of privacy rights began under British common law, which protected "only the physical interference of life and property." Its ...
Prolog - Extensions - Types
... Attempts to introduce types date back to the 1980s, and as of 2008 there are still attempts to extend Prolog with types ... Type information is useful not only for type safety but also for reasoning about Prolog programs ...
Netwar - Network Structures
... Arquilla and Ronfeldt point to three basic types of networks that may be used by netwar actors Chain network – typified by smuggling networks, where end-to-end ... Netwar actors may also take on hybrid forms as well, blending different types of networks and hierarchies ... same group may be networked to each other through different types of network structures ...

Famous quotes containing the words types of, privacy and/or types:

    ... there are two types of happiness and I have chosen that of the murderers. For I am happy. There was a time when I thought I had reached the limit of distress. Beyond that limit, there is a sterile and magnificent happiness.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    The emphasis must be not on the right to abortion but on the right to privacy and reproductive control.
    Ruth Bader Ginsberg (b. 1933)

    If there is nothing new on the earth, still the traveler always has a resource in the skies. They are constantly turning a new page to view. The wind sets the types on this blue ground, and the inquiring may always read a new truth there.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)