Organizational Structure of The Central Intelligence Agency

Organizational Structure Of The Central Intelligence Agency

The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is a vast and complicated organization with many divisions and subdivisions, consisting mainly of an executive office, four major directorates, and a variety of specialized offices. Prior to the creation of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, it had some additional responsibilities for the Intelligence Community as a whole.

Read more about Organizational Structure Of The Central Intelligence Agency:  Contents, Seal of The CIA, Organizational Charts, Executive Offices, National Estimates, Directorate of Intelligence, National Clandestine Service, Directorate of Science and Technology, Directorate of Support

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Organizational Structure Of The Central Intelligence Agency - Other Offices - Public Affairs
... The Office of Public Affairs advises the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency on all media, public policy, and employee communications issues relating to his role as CIA ...

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