North

North is a noun, adjective, or adverb indicating direction or geography.

North is one of the four cardinal directions or compass points. It is the opposite of south and is perpendicular to east and west.

By convention, the top side of a map is north.

To go north using a compass for navigation, set a bearing or azimuth of 0° or 360°.

North is specifically the direction that, in Western culture, is treated as the fundamental direction:

  • North is used (explicitly or implicitly) to define all other directions.
  • The (visual) top edges of maps usually correspond to the northern edge of the area represented, unless explicitly stated otherwise or landmarks are considered more useful for that territory than specific directions.
  • On any rotating object, north denotes the side appearing to rotate counter-clockwise when viewed from afar along the axis of rotation.

Read more about North:  Etymology, Magnetic North and Declination, Roles of North As Prime Direction, Roles of East and West As Inherently Subsidiary Directions, Cultural References

Other articles related to "north":

North Atlantic Current
... The North Atlantic Current (also known as North Atlantic Drift and North Atlantic Sea Movement) is a powerful warm ocean current that continues the Gulf Stream northeast ... The other major branch continues north along the coast of northwestern Europe ... Driven by the global thermohaline circulation (THC), the North Atlantic Current is also often considered part of the wind-driven Gulf Stream which goes further east and north from the North ...

Famous quotes containing the word north:

    The Bostonians are really, as a race, far inferior in point of anything beyond mere intellect to any other set upon the continent of North America. They are decidedly the most servile imitators of the English it is possible to conceive.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1845)

    The battle of the North Atlantic is a grim business, and it isn’t going to be won by charm and personality.
    —Edmund H. North, British screenwriter, and Lewis Gilbert. First Sea Lord (Laurence Naismith)

    Civilization does not engross all the virtues of humanity: she has not even her full share of them. They flourish in greater abundance and attain greater strength among many barbarous people. The hospitality of the wild Arab, the courage of the North American Indian, and the faithful friendships of some of the Polynesian nations, far surpass any thing of a similar kind among the polished communities of Europe.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)