Molecular Biology - Techniques of Molecular Biology

Techniques of Molecular Biology

Since the late 1950s and early 1960s, molecular biologists have learned to characterize, isolate, and manipulate the molecular components of cells and organisms. These components include DNA, the repository of genetic information; RNA, a close relative of DNA whose functions range from serving as a temporary working copy of DNA to actual structural and enzymatic functions as well as a functional and structural part of the translational apparatus; and proteins, the major structural and enzymatic type of molecule in cells.

For more extensive list on protein methods, see protein methods. For more extensive list on nucleic acid methods, see nucleic acid methods.

Read more about this topic:  Molecular Biology

Other articles related to "techniques of molecular biology, molecular biology, technique":

Techniques of Molecular Biology - Antiquated Technologies
... In molecular biology, procedures and technologies are continually being developed and older technologies abandoned ... sucrose gradients, a slow and labor-intensive technique requiring expensive instrumentation prior to sucrose gradients, viscometry was used ... older technology, as it is occasionally useful to solve another new problem for which the newer technique is inappropriate ...

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