Moffat - Early Tourism As A Spa Town

Early Tourism As A Spa Town

During the 17th century Moffat began to grow from a small village into a popular spa town. The sulphurous waters of Moffat Spa were believed to have healing properties and during the Victorian era the high demand led to the water being piped down from the well to a specially built bath house in the town centre (now the Town Hall). Luxurious hotels sprang up to accommodate the increasing numbers of tourists. One such hotel opened during Moffat's heyday in 1878, Moffat's Hydropathic hotel was destroyed in a fire in 1921.

The old well was refurbished in the mid 1990s, and is still accessible by vehicle and foot. The water smells very strongly of sulphur, with deposits on the walls and well itself. At the grand reopening of the well people visiting it were encouraged to drink a glass of it.

The well can be reached by following Haywood Road and climbing up Tank Wood (on the right at the top) - the path at the end was the original route to the well. An alternative is to drive or walk up Well Road and eventually you will reach the Well Cottage and the car park for the well. When the water was first piped into town for the baths it was pumped uphill to a tank in the appropriately named Tank Wood, before travelling back downhill to the bath house.

Larchhill Well was a Chalybeate well located on Old Well Road near Wellwoodhead Cottage. The well is no longer visible.

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