List of Feminist Rhetoricians - Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf

(1882–1941) Woolf was a member of the Bloomsbury Group and noted for her feminist works. One of her most famous works is Mrs. Dalloway.

  • "Professions for Women" (1942)

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Other articles related to "virginia woolf, woolf":

Susan Sellers - Life
... Sellers' interest in the writings of Virginia Woolf has led to her involvement in the Cambridge University Press edition of Woolf's writings, which she co-directs with Jane Goldman ... in its mapping of the variants between the first British edition of Woolf's texts and those she subsequently oversaw – in particular the first American publication ... It also aims to provide full annotation to Woolf's densely allusive prose ...
Louise De Salvo - Works
... Virginia Woolf's First Voyage A Novel in the Making (Rowman Littlefield Publishers Inc ... Hawthorne (Brill Academic Publishers, Incorporated, 1987) Virginia Woolf The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse on Her Life and Work (Ballantine Books, 1990) Territories of the ... Conceived with Malice Literature as Revenge in the Lives of Woolf, Lawrence, Barnes, Miller (Plume, 1994) Breathless An Asthma Journal (Beacon Press, 1997) Vertigo A Memoir (Pen ...
Louise De Salvo - Life
... DeSalvo is also a renowned Virginia Woolf scholar ... She has edited editions of Woolf's first novel Melymbrosia, as well as The Letters of Vita Sackville-West and Virginia Woolf, which documents the ... In addition, she has written two books on Woolf, Virginia Woolf The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse on Her Life and Work and Virginia Woolf's First Voyage A Novel in the Making ...

Famous quotes by virginia woolf:

    The comparison between Coleridge and Johnson is obvious in so far as each held sway chiefly by the power of his tongue. The difference between their methods is so marked that it is tempting, but also unnecessary, to judge one to be inferior to the other. Johnson was robust, combative, and concrete; Coleridge was the opposite. The contrast was perhaps in his mind when he said of Johnson: ‘his bow-wow manner must have had a good deal to do with the effect produced.’
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)

    Rigid, the skeleton of habit alone upholds the human frame.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)

    The connection between dress and war is not far to seek; your finest clothes are those you wear as soldiers.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)

    The first duty of a lecturer—to hand you after an hour’s discourse a nugget of pure truth to wrap up between the pages of your notebooks and keep on the mantlepiece for ever.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)

    I’m glad to find that you dislike Venice because I thought it detestable when we were there, both times—once it might be due to insanity but not twice, so I thought it must be my fault. I suppose the obscurer reaches might be beautiful.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)