Leibniz

Some articles on leibniz:

Leibniz-Gemeinschaft - History
... The Leibniz-Gemeinschaft is named after the German philosopher, mathematician, scientist, and inventor Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) ... Leibniz-Gemeinschaft has its registered office in Berlin there are branches in Bonn und Bruxelles ... Karl Ulrich Mayer is president of the Leibniz Association, Christiane Neumann acts as secretary general ...
Continuum (theory) - In Mathematics and Philosophy
... Bell isolates two distinct historical conceptions of infinitesimal, one by Leibniz and one by Nieuwentijdt, and argues that Leibniz's conception was implemented in Robinson's hyperreal continuum, whereas ...
Multiple Discovery - Civility
... After Isaac Newton and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz had exchanged information on their respective systems of calculus in the 1670s, Newton in the first edition of ... In 1699, however, a Swiss mathematician suggested to Britain's Royal Society that Leibniz had borrowed his calculus from Newton ... In 1705 Leibniz, in an anonymous review of Newton's Opticks, implied that Newton's fluxions (Newton's term for differential calculus) were an adaptation of Leibniz's calculus ...
Leibniz-Gemeinschaft - Sections - E - Environmental Science
... Name Location Acronym Website Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering Potsdam-Bornim ATB www.atb-potsdam.de Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences Kiel IFM-GEOMAR www.ifm-ge ...
Leibniz–Clarke Correspondence
... The Leibniz–Clarke correspondence was a scientific, theological and philosophical debate conducted in an exchange of letters between the German thinker Gottfried Wilhelm ... The exchange began because of a letter Leibniz wrote to Caroline of Ansbach, in which he remarked that Newtonian physics was detrimental to natural theology ... the Newtonian view, Clarke responded, and the correspondence continued until the death of Leibniz in 1716 ...

Famous quotes containing the word leibniz:

    Navarette, a Chinese missionary, agrees with Leibniz and says that “It is the special providence of God that the Chinese did not know what was done in Christendom; for if they did, there would be never a man among them, but would spit in our faces.”
    Matthew Tindal (1653–1733)