LCD Television

LCD Television

Liquid-crystal display televisions (LCD TV) are television sets that use LCD display technology to produce images. LCD televisions are thinner and lighter than cathode ray tube (CRTs) of similar display size, and are available in much larger sizes. When manufacturing costs fell, this combination of features made LCDs practical for television receivers.

In 2007, LCD televisions surpassed sales of CRT-based televisions worldwide for the first time, and their sales figures relative to other technologies are accelerating. LCD TVs are quickly displacing the only major competitors in the large-screen market, the plasma display panel and rear-projection television. LCDs are, by far, the most widely produced and sold television display type.

LCDs also have a variety of disadvantages. Other technologies address these weaknesses, including organic light-emitting diodes (OLED), FED and SED, but as of 2011 none of these have entered widespread production.

Read more about LCD Television:  Environmental Effects

Other articles related to "lcd television, lcd":

Large-screen Television Technology - Display Technologies - LCD Television
... A pixel on an LCD consists of multiple layers of components two polarizing filters, two glass plates with electrodes, and liquid crystal molecules ... Twisted nematic liquid crystals are naturally twisted, and are commonly used for LCD’s because they react predictably to temperature variation and electric current ... In a color LCD each pixel consists of red, green, and blue subpixels, which require appropriate color filters in addition to the components mentioned previously ...
LCD Television - Environmental Effects
... See also Electronic waste The production of LCD screens uses nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) as an etching fluid during the production of the thin-film components ...

Famous quotes containing the word television:

    It is marvelous indeed to watch on television the rings of Saturn close; and to speculate on what we may yet find at galaxy’s edge. But in the process, we have lost the human element; not to mention the high hope of those quaint days when flight would create “one world.” Instead of one world, we have “star wars,” and a future in which dumb dented human toys will drift mindlessly about the cosmos long after our small planet’s dead.
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925)