Iceland Hotspot - Theories of Causation

Theories of Causation

There is an ongoing discussion whether the hotspot is caused by a deep mantle plume or originates at a much shallower depth.

Some geologists have questioned whether the Iceland hotspot has the same origin as other hotspots such as the Hawaii hotspot. While the Hawaiian island chain and the Emperor Seamounts show a clear time-progressive volcanic track caused by the movement of the Pacific Plate over the Hawaiian hotspot, no such track can be seen at Iceland.

It is proposed that the line Grímsvötn volcano to Surtsey shows the movement of the Eurasian Plate and the line Grímsvötn volcano to Snæfellsnes volcanic belt shows the movement of the North American Plate.

Read more about this topic:  Iceland Hotspot

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