Hawaii

Hawaii (i/həˈwaɪ.iː/ or /həˈwaɪʔiː/; Hawaiian: Hawaiʻi ) is the most recent of the 50 U.S. states (joined the Union on August 21, 1959), and is the only U.S. state made up entirely of islands. It is the northernmost island group in Polynesia, occupying most of an archipelago in the central Pacific Ocean.

Hawaii’s diverse natural scenery, warm tropical climate, abundance of public beaches and oceanic surrounding, and active volcanoes make it a popular destination for tourists, surfers, biologists, and volcanologists alike. Due to its mid-Pacific location, Hawaii has many North American and Asian influences along with its own vibrant native culture. Hawaii has over a million permanent residents along with many visitors and U.S. military personnel. Its capital is Honolulu on the island of Oʻahu.

The state encompasses nearly the entire volcanic Hawaiian Island chain, which comprises hundreds of islands spread over 1,500 miles (2,400 km). At the southeastern end of the archipelago, the eight "main islands" are (from the northwest to southeast) Niʻihau, Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, Kahoʻolawe, Maui and the island of Hawaiʻi. The last is by far the largest and is often called "The Big Island" to avoid confusion with the state as a whole. The archipelago is physiographically and ethnologically part of the Polynesian subregion of Oceania.

Hawaii is the 8th-least extensive, the 11th-least populous, but the 13th-most densely populated of the 50 U.S. states. Hawaii's coastline is approximately 750 miles (1,210 km) long, which is fourth in the United States after Alaska, Florida and California.

Hawaii is one of two states that do not observe daylight saving time, the other being Arizona. Hawaii is also one of two states that are not in the Contiguous United States, the other being Alaska.

Read more about Hawaii:  Etymology, Geography and Environment, History, Economy, Culture, Health, Governance, Transportation

Other articles related to "hawaii":

United States Minister To Hawaii
... The Minister to Hawaii was an office of the United States Department of State to the Kingdom of Hawaii during the period of 1810 to 1898 ... by the President of the United States with the consent of Congress, the Minister to Hawaii was equivalent in rank to the present-day ambassador of the United States to foreign governments ... As principal envoy of the United States government to the monarch of Hawaii, the Minister to Hawaii often dealt in affairs relating to economic, military and political matters affecting both nations ...
Hawaii - Transportation
... See also Hawaii Department of Transportation and Aviation in Hawaii A system of state highways encircles each main island ... Honolulu International Airport is the major commercial aviation hub of Hawaii, with intercontinental services to North America, Asia, Australia, and Oceania ... Within Hawaii, Hawaiian Airlines, Mokulele Airlines and go! use jets between the larger airports in Honolulu, Līhuʻe, Kahului, Kona and Hilo, while Island Air ...
Kalapana, Hawaii
... the Hawaiian Islands and can be reached either by Hawaii Route 130 from Pāhoa or by Hawaii Route 137 ...
Scouting In Hawaii - Girl Scouting in Hawaii - Girl Scouts of Hawai'i
... Headquarters Honolulu, Hawaii Web Site http//www.girlscouts-hawaii.org/ Service Centers Wailuku, Maui Līhuʻe, Kauaʻi Keaʻau, Hawaii Kailua-Kona, Hawaii ...
1978 Hawaii State Constitutional Convention
... The 1978 Hawaii State Constitutional Convention is regarded to be the watershed political event in the modern State of Hawaii ... The Hawaiian language became the official state language of Hawaii for the first time since the overthrow ... future Speaker of the House John David Waihee III, future Governor Constitution of Hawaii Kingdom of Hawai'i 1893 ... Draft Republic and Territory ...

Famous quotes containing the word hawaii:

    Flower picking.
    Hawaiian saying no. 2710, ‘lelo No’Eau, collected, translated, and annotated by Mary Kawena Pukui, Bishop Museum Press, Hawaii (1983)

    It is the space inside that gives the drum its sound.
    Hawaiian saying no. 1189, ‘lelo No’Eau, collected, translated, and annotated by Mary Kawena Pukui, Bishop Museum Press, Hawaii (1983)

    A fallen tree does not rise again.
    Hawaiian saying no. 2412, ‘lelo No’Eau, collected, translated, and annotated by Mary Kawena Pukui, Bishop Museum Press, Hawaii (1983)