Garlic

Allium sativum, commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion genus, Allium. Its close relatives include the onion, shallot, leek, chive, and rakkyo. With a history of human use of over 7,000 years, garlic is native to central Asia, and has long been a staple in the Mediterranean region, as well as a frequent seasoning in Asia, Africa, and Europe. It was known to Ancient Egyptians, and has been used for both culinary and medicinal purposes.

Read more about GarlicDescription, Origin and Major Types, Varieties, Cultivation, Properties, Spiritual and Religious Perceptions, Gallery

Other articles related to "garlic":

Garlic - Gallery
... Garlic bulbs and cloves Garlic growing in a container Garlic bulbs and individual cloves, one peeled Garlic scapes are often harvested early so that the bulbs will grow bigger A bulb of garlic, split A bulb ...
List Of French Dishes - Provence/Côte D'Azur
... a vegetable stew with olive oil, aubergine, courgette, bell pepper, tomato, onion and garlic) Pieds paquets (Lambs feet and tripe 'parcels' in a savoury sauce) Soupe au pistou (bean soup ...
Snow Mountain Garlic
... Snow Mountain Garlic (commonly known as Kashmiri Garlic) is a variety of garlic found in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir ...
Carne De Vinha D' Alhos
... The name means "Meat of Wine Garlic", that is meat with wine and garlic, the meat usually being pork or rabbit ... known as "pickled pork", or "vina dosh." It is also known as "garlic pork" in Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana where it was introduced in the early 19th century ...
Laba Festival - Customs - Laba Garlic
... Another Laba food is Laba garlic, which is particularly popular in northern China ... Garlic in Chinese, suan, shares the same pronunciation with 'calculate' ...

Famous quotes containing the word garlic:

    As a rule they will refuse even to sample a foreign dish, they regard such things as garlic and olive oil with disgust, life is unliveable to them unless they have tea and puddings.
    George Orwell (1903–1950)

    Hatred, for the man who is not engaged in it, is a little like the odor of garlic for one who hasn’t eaten any.
    Jean Rostand (1894–1977)