File System

A file system (or filesystem) is an abstraction to store, retrieve and update a set of files. The term also identifies the data structures specified by some of those abstractions, which are designed to organize multiple files as a single stream of bytes, and the network protocols specified by some other of those abstractions, which are designed to allow files on a remote machine to be accessed. By extension, the term also identifies software or firmware components that implement the abstraction (i.e. that actually access the data source on behalf of other software or firmware that uses those components).

The file system manages access to the data and the metadata of the files, and manages the available space of the device(s) which contain it. Ensuring reliability is a major responsibility of a file system. A file system organizes data in an efficient manner, and may be tuned to the characteristics of the backing device.

Some file systems are used on data storage devices, to maintain the locations of the files on the device (which is seen as a stream of bytes). Others provide access to files residing on a server, by acting as clients for a network protocol (e.g. NFS, SMB, or 9P clients). Others provide access to data that is not stored on a persistent device, and/or may be computed on request (e.g. procfs). This is distinguished from a directory service and registry.

Read more about File SystemTypes of File Systems, File Systems and Operating Systems

Other articles related to "file system, systems, system, files, file, file systems":

LOCUS (operating System) - Description - File System - Node Dependent Files
... As with other SSI systems LOCUS sometimes found it necessary to break the illusion of a single system, notably to allow some files to be different on a per-node basis ... would be needed The solution was to replace the files that needed to be different on a per node basis by special hidden directories ... These directories would then contain the different versions of the file ...
Slice (disk) - PC Partition Types - Primary Partition
... Further information Partition type A primary partition contains one file system ... In DOS and all versions of Microsoft Windows systems, what Microsoft calls the system partition was required to be the first partition ... All Windows operating systems from Windows 95 onwards can be located on ( almost ) any partition, but the boot files (io.sys, bootmgr, ntldr, etc.) must be on a primary partition ...
Live File System
... Live File System is the term Microsoft uses to describe the packet writing method of creating discs in Windows Vista and later, which allows files to be added incrementally to the media ... These discs use the UDF file system ... The Live File System option is used by default by AutoPlay when formatting/erasing a CD/DVD -R or -RW ...
Sparta DOS X - Characteristics - The SpartaDOS File System
... The proprietary file system format, called SpartaDOS FS, (unrelated to and not compatible with MS-DOS FAT) offers full support for subdirectories, MS-DOS-like attributes (A ... The file naming convenience is 8+3 (this scheme, inherited from CP/M, is normal on Atari) ... can contain up to 1423 entries of files and other directories ...
File System - Limitations - Long File Paths and Long File Names
... In hierarchical file systems, files are accessed by means of a path that is a branching list of directories containing the file ... Different file systems have different limits on the depth of the path ... File systems also have a limit on the length of an individual filename ...

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