Ethiopia - Regions, Zones, and Districts

Regions, Zones, and Districts

Before 1996, Ethiopia was divided into 13 provinces, many derived from historical regions. Ethiopia now has a tiered government system consisting of a federal government overseeing ethnically based regional countries, zones, districts (woredas), and neighborhoods (kebele).

Since 1996, Ethiopia has been divided into nine ethnically-based and politically autonomous regional states (kililoch, singular kilil) and two chartered cities (astedader akababiwoch, singular astedader akababi), the latter being Addis Ababa and Dire Dawa (subdivisions 1 and 5 in the map, respectively). The kililoch are subdivided into sixty-eight zones, and then further into 550 woredas and several special woredas.

The constitution assigns extensive power to regional states that can establish their own government and democracy according to the federal government's constitution. Each region has at its apex a regional council where members are directly elected to represent the districts and the council has legislative and executive power to direct internal affairs of the regions. Article 39 of the Ethiopian Constitution further gives every regional state the right to secede from Ethiopia. There is debate, however, as to how much of the power guaranteed in the constitution is actually given to the states. The councils implement their mandate through an executive committee and regional sectoral bureaus. Such elaborate structure of council, executive, and sectoral public institutions is replicated to the next level (woreda).

Region or city Capital Area (km2) Population
at census
11 October 1994
Population
at census
28 May 2007
Population
1 July 2012
estimate
Addis Ababa (astedader) Addis Ababa 526.99 2,100,031 2,738,248 3,041,002
Affar (kilil) Aysa'iita 72,052.78 1,051,641 1,411,092 1,602,995
Amhara (kilil) Bahir Dar 154,708.96 13,270,898 17,214,056 18,866,002
Benishangul-Gumuz (kilil) Asosa 50,698.68 460,325 670,847 982,004
Dire Dawa (astedader) Dire Dawa 1,558.61 248,549 342,827 387,000
Gambella (kilil) Gambella 29,782.82 162,271 306,916 385,997
Harari (kilil) Harar 333.94 130,691 183,344 210,000
Oromia (kilil) Finfinne 298,164.29 18,465,449 27,158,471 31,294,992
Somali (kilil) Jijiga 327,068.00 3,144,963 4,439,147 5,148,989
Southern Nations, Nationalities,
and People's Region (kilil)
Awassa 105,887.18 10,377,028 15,042,531 17,359,008
Tigray (kilil) Mekele 85,366.53 3,134,470 4,314,456 4,929,999
Special enumerated zones 96,570 112,999
Totals 1,127,127.00 51,766,239 73,918,505 84,320,987

Source: CSA, Ethiopia

Read more about this topic:  Ethiopia

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