Early Scots

Early Scots describes the emerging literary language of the Northern Middle English speaking parts of Scotland in the period before 1450. The northern forms of Middle English descended from Northumbrian Old English. During this period, speakers referred to the language as "English" (Inglis, Ynglis, and variants).

Early examples such as Barbour’s The Brus and Wyntoun’s Chronicle are better explained as part of Northern Middle English than as isolated forerunners of later Scots, a name first used to describe the language later in the Middle Scots period.

Read more about Early Scots:  History, Vocabulary, Orthography, Phonology

Other articles related to "early, early scots, scots":

Scots Language - History
... The succeeding variety of Early northern Middle English spoken in southeastern Scotland, also known as Early Scots, began to diverge from that of Northumbria due to twelfth and thirteenth century immigration of ... Later influences on the development of Scots were from Romance languages via ecclesiastical and legal Latin, Norman and later Parisian French due to the Auld Alliance as ... Scots also includes loan words resulting from contact with Gaelic ...
Languages Of Scotland - Germanic Languages - Scots Language
... Scots has its origins in the variety of Early northern Middle English spoken in southeastern Scotland, also known as Early Scots ... Later influences on the development of Scots were from Romance languages via ecclesiastical and legal Latin, Norman and later Parisian French due to the Auld Alliance as well as Dutch and Middle ... Scots also includes loan words resulting from contact with Scottish Gaelic ...
History Of The Scots Language - Early Scots
... After the 12th century early northern Middle English began to spread north and eastwards ... It was from this dialect that Early Scots, known to its speakers as "English" (Inglis), began to develop, which is why in the late 12th century Adam of Dryburgh ... the English-speaking people of Lothian who lived under the King of Scots had to accept Scottish identity ...

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